Tag Archive | metaphysics

Thanks To Our Veterans

 


Thank You For Your Service

To all veterans Past, Present and Future.
From far away, to here at home.
On active duty or duty served.
We honor your courage and sacrifice.
We extend our gratitude for your commitment.
As we share our thanks and gratitude,
for the freedom you have protected.
Spring © 2014

 

© Springwolfs Hanko

© 2018 Springwolf, D.D., Ph.D. Springwolf Reflections / Springs Haven, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Advertisements

U.S. Counties Want To Move Halloween

Image from: Megan Granata Upsetting Witches

It happens every year. Some County official somewhere in the U.S., wants to move the observance of Halloween for little Trick-or-Treaters and I suddenly get hundreds of emails from practicing Witches about how this angers them to no end. Litterally, beginning around October 1st, I start receiving emails. By the end of the month I’ve received over 200 when all is said and done.

This year, I’m up to 167 so far. with less than a week to go. Hopefully that means word is getting out. But the general sentiment is often the same,  “What right do these people have to move OUR holiday!” Here’s my question in response, Why are you upset, Halloween IS NOT our holiday?

Whether you use the Gaelic pronunciation “Sow-en”, “Sow-ween”, “Sah-ween” or the Americanized version “Sam-hain” (yes that is an acceptable pronunciation), Samhain is still the biggest holiday on the Pagan Calendar.

Samhain is a Gaelic word, and it translates to “Summer’s End”. It marks the end of the growing season and the transition into Winter. It also marks the Celtic New Year and it is observed with both reverence and of course a big party celebration. Continue reading

Merry Lughnasadh or Imbolg!

Arctic Wolf Fire

“Arctic Wolf Fire”
By Tom-in-Silence

The Summer Fire Festival

It’s time for the first of the Harvest Festivals, we know it as Lughnasadh for Celtic paths. Also known as the summer fire festival it is always a fun event to honor the changing seasons!

As with most things on the pagan calendar, different traditions celebrate and recognize seasonal festivals at different times of the year. Here in the northern Hemisphere, Lughnasadh is recognized on August 1st or 2nd.  It’s the time to recognize and honor Gratitude, Abundance, and bring things to Fruition (Getting it done!)

In the Southern Hemisphere this is the time for Imbolg, the Festival of Lights, when honoring the goddess Brigid and Purification, Initiation, and Dedication to one’s path is recognized.

There are many ways to give thanks and honor during this 1st harvest festival. It celebrates the warmth of the sun, the rain and the faery folk who help tend to the gardens, flocks and fields. As a Celtic festival of the harvest, what better way to give thanks than to prepare a meal with the harvest of your own garden.

Which ever holiday you observe, may it be a wonderful and blessed celebration!

From all of us here to all of you;
Merry Lughnasadh & Imbolg!!
Springwolf   🐾

© Springwolfs Hanko

© 2013 Springwolf, D.D., Ph.D. Springwolf Reflections / Springs Haven, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

It’s the 2nd Friday the 13th For 2018

Thirteen On Springwolf ReflectionsDo You Know The Origins of Friday the 13th?

Once again it’s another 13th day that lands on a Friday. Once again, news organizations are publishing articles about where the day came from and who started it. And once again, their general line is “no one knows where it started”. Yeah, um…No. What they mean is, they don’t want to look at Pagan History and find yet another thing they observe that’s based on Pagan beliefs and practices.

We know where the day came from. We know generally when it started. And we know it is NOT based in Christian lore concerning the Knights Templar.

If you’re interested in the Pagan History of this day, you’ll have to turn to indo-European pagans. And the persecution of an old peaceful religion.
History of Friday the 13th – It’s a good day for Pagans.

Artist Unknown

Oh, and I forgot. This Friday the 13th falls in the range of the New Moon celebrations. You might want to include a little Moon Magik in your celebrations. This holiday for Pagans is all about good luck and receiving blessings from the Divine (who or whatever that is to you). The New Moon phase is best used for personal growth, healing and blessing of new projects or ventures. A great time to share that energy with the good luck of the 13th. It’s also a good time to cleanse and consecrate new tools and objects you wish to use during rituals, ceremonies or an up coming festival.

May you all have a blessed and wonderful day.

 

 

 

© Springwolfs Hanko

© 2018 Springwolf, D.D., Ph.D. Springwolf Reflections / Springs Haven, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Merry Imbolg & Lammas 2018

Celebration of the return Sun

Celebration of the Sun

The Festival of Lights and Fire

The time of Spring is upon us here in the Northern Hemisphere as the Sun begins his return to warm our hearts and extend his light in our day. His return rings in the first of the Spring Holidays known as Imbolc, Imbolg, Brigid’s Day or the Festival of Lights.

In the Southern Hemisphere the summer is marked by its peak of the Sun during the Fire Festival. It is the time of Lughnasadh, also known as Lammas or the Fire Festival which honors the Celtic hero Lugh. It is the first of the Pagan Harvest Festivals and the time of year to thank the Tuatha Dé Danann (the Faeries) for their help in our gardens.

These Sabbats (Pagan Holidays) are observed on February 1st or 2nd, depending on one’s personal Tradition (spiritual denomination). Because Pagans celebrate on a Lunar Calendar schedule, our holiday observances actually begin  at sunset on the evening before the scheduled day.

Those who recognize February 1st as the observed holiday, will begin their rituals on January 31st. While others, like my Clan, being our celebrations tonight and observe the holiday on February 1st.

This year we’re blessed with the energy of GrandMother Moon’s full phase, ringing in the Snow Moon for the north and the  Thunder Moon of the south.

Everyone here at Springwolf Reflections and Spring’s Haven extend our wishes to you and yours for a wonderful and joyous celebration of warmth and light. Where ever you are in the world,

May Your Season Be Blessed with Abundance and Happiness

© Springwolfs Hanko

© 2014 Springwolf, D.D., Ph.D. Springwolf Reflections / Springs Haven, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

The Legend of the Sacred King

Father Sun and Mother Earth

A Celtic Tale of Sacrifice and the Blood Moon

In ancient history, many cultures hold tales concerning a Sacred King. Back then a King was a form of deity, or was placed on a throne by Divine hands. As such they were worshiped as much as they were revered and honored. The Sacred King we’re going to talk about comes from the early pagan days of the Celts.

In this tale, the Sacred King is associated with the Sun, and in some variations with the Sun God Lugh who is honored during the 1st Harvest Festival known as Lughnasadh, celebrated on August 1st in Northern Hemisphere.  Elements of this story are scattered through pagan festivals throughout the year, and have been passed on through the generations of practitioners primarily through oral tales. Even today, most Pagans celebrate these events in our modern festivals and rituals, but often as separate events instead of one long story arc. 

In his writings, Sir James George Frazer describes in a book called The Golden Bough (1890–1915); the sacred king represented the spirit of vegetation. He came into being in the spring, reigned during the summer, and ritually died at harvest time, only to be reborn at the winter solstice to wax and rule again. 

Elements of Frazer’s book, document Pagan tales celebrated throughout the cycle of the year in one story. There are elements of the Holy and Oak King, who share governance of the seasons as they wax and wane between summer and winter. There’s the association of the fertile spring equinox when the Great God and Maiden Goddess unite and reign through the summer. And the outcome of that union in the fall, which provides for an abundant harvest season. Continue reading

Stop Mixing Mysticism with Science!

Merlin's Blood Moon by Springwolf 🐾

Merlin’s Blood Moon by Springwolf 🐾

NO, IT IS NOT A FULL BLUE BLOOD MOON!

I wish these mainstream media people would stop mixing mysticism with science. If you’re going to mix spiritual mysticism with scientific explanation, you should at least get the mysticism part right.

Early Pagans coined the phrase “Blood Moon” to signify the full moon phases of the Fall Harvest. Every full moon during the harvest season was once known as the Blood Moon and it has nothing to do with the color of the Moon.

Over time, that monthly harvest celebration evolved to become the Full Moon nearest the Autumn Equinox or the first full moon of the autumn harvest, also known as the Harvest Moon. For most Pagans, that Full Harvest Moon occurs in September or October, if you’re in the Northern Hemisphere. Continue reading