Tag Archive | full

Stop Mixing Mysticism with Science!

Merlin's Blood Moon by Springwolf 🐾

Merlin’s Blood Moon by Springwolf 🐾

NO, IT IS NOT A FULL BLUE BLOOD MOON!

I wish these mainstream media people would stop mixing mysticism with science. If you’re going to mix spiritual mysticism with scientific explanation, you should at least get the mysticism part right.

Early Pagans coined the phrase “Blood Moon” to signify the full moon phases of the Fall Harvest. Every full moon during the harvest season was once known as the Blood Moon and it has nothing to do with the color of the Moon.

Over time, that monthly harvest celebration evolved to become the Full Moon nearest the Autumn Equinox or the first full moon of the autumn harvest, also known as the Harvest Moon. For most Pagans, that Full Harvest Moon occurs in September or October, if you’re in the Northern Hemisphere. Continue reading

Advertisements

2018 New Year Full Moon & Blue Moon

Moonlit Newgrange Burial Chamber and Standing Stone, County Meath, Ireland.
Photographer: Tim Hannan

January 1st Full Moon

Are you ready for the Full Moon on January 1st? It’s the Winter Wolf Moon in my Clan. And because the moon is still so close to Earth in its Perigee during December 2017, a lot of folks are also calling this coming full moon the Supermoon for 2018.

Supermoons aren’t anything extra special in the world of science. It’s just a commercial name for when the Moon is closest to Earth during its regular orbit around the planet. Because the Moon is closer to Earth in its perigee, it appears to be bigger than what we’re used to seeing during any other full moon through the year.

For Pagans, these closer moons can mean GrandMother Moon is coming in close to look in on the Children of Mother Earth. Esbat rituals (special observances for the phases of the moon) may give special honor to the Old Crone aspect of the Triple Goddess.

January Blue Moon

To top it off, because the full moon is occurring so early in the month, it allows us to squeeze in a 2nd full moon for this month. A Blue Moon, which graces our presence on January 31st, 2018 at 8:27am.

Many in the media are trying to promote this Blue Moon as a “Blood Moon”. It’s not! A Blood Moon is a very specific time of the year for Pagans. And since the name comes from a Pagan observance, I think we get to say when it occurs.  They need to Stop Mixing Mysticism with Science –  No it’s not a Blood Moon.

There are several articles here on my blog that talk more in-depth about these special phases of the Moon that you might be interested in.

© Springwolfs Hanko

© 2017 Springwolf, D.D., Ph.D. Springwolf Reflections / Springs Haven, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

The Full Moon In The Southern Hemisphere

"Merlin In The Moon" by Springwolf 🐾

“Merlin In The Moon” by Springwolf 🐾

What Is The Name Of The Moon

As with all things in the world, where you are located will dictate how you associate this to that. Meaning and names of objects like the Moon vary around the world. Cultures assign names to each full moon based on their traditions, climate, animals, crops and how they view the world around them. There isn’t one complete list of this to that anywhere or for anything. There are many.

When it comes to Full Moon names, you can’t simply take a set of names from the North, reverse them and apply them to the South. This assumes we all look at things the same way through the same eyes. Imagine a Native American from the Cherokee Nation applying their moon names to the Aboriginal moon phases in Australia. It probably wouldn’t make sense to the folks who live down under.

But because Europeans settled in both the North and South, many of the moon names traveled with them to new lands and continents. In many ways this does a dis-service to the original peoples of the land in question and the names they came to know and associate with the Moon phases. Like the Tribal Nations in America, each group has its own language. The most common reference for the moon is Alkina and it’s associated with female energy. But try to find which Aboriginal Nation uses that word. I didn’t have any luck at all. Many words for the moon in other nations associate the moon with masculine energy. And that’s just Australia.

The Maori are the first people of New Zealand. They brought their Polynesian Mythology and the name of Moon with them to the land of the Kiwis. Here the Moon gets her name from the Goddess Marama, who governs the Moon and Death.

Continue reading

2016 Equinox and the Full Moon

Moon Phase by Udell Enterprises, Inc.

Moon Phase by Udell Enterprises, Inc.

A Special Conjunction

This year, the first equinox coincides with a full moon. For Pagans this heightens the energy for both the Equinox holiday and the observance of the full moon.

The equinox marks that time of the year when the Earth begins to shift on its axis. It marks the change of seasons for each hemisphere; from Winter to Spring in the north and Summer to Fall in the south.

It’s best known as being the time when the number of hours for the day is equal to the number of hours for the night. But this isn’t accurate.

..day and night are not exactly equal at the equinox for two reasons. First, daytime begins the moment any part of the Sun is over the horizon, and it is not over until the last part of the Sun has set. If the Sun were to shrink to a starlike point and we lived in a world without air, the spring and fall equinoxes would truly have ‘equal nights.’ – From The Old Farmer’s Almanac

Here in Richmond Virginia, the equinox officially occurs on Sunday, March 20, 2016 at 12:30 AM EDT. That’s midnight on Saturday night. You can visit TimeAndDate.com to find the exact time in your area.

This astronomical event has long been observed as a spiritual occurrence. And that’s certainly true for Pagans around the world. But what that holiday celebrates and who or what it honors depends on if you’re in the Northern Hemisphere or in the South. Since Pagans begin their holiday observance at sunset and celebrate during the night hours, this becomes an important honoring of the event. Continue reading

Lughnasadh / Imbolg And The Blue Moon

Lammas Blue Moon

Lammas Blue Moon

The Celtic Holiday Of Lugh Under The Blue Moon

Tonight in the Northern Hemisphere many Pagans will be celebrating the 1st harvest festival of the season, Lughnasadh, also known as Lammas. In the Southern Hemisphere Pagans are celebrating Imbog.

This is an exciting time for Pagans. As the sun sets on July 31st Northern Pagans will honor the Sun and his blessings upon the gardens and fields.  Lughnasadh is known as a Fire Festival and celebrates the Celtic hero Lugh as the Sun God who saved Ireland from its oppressors. Freeing the people from slavery and ensuring the land would always be fertile and abundant.

In the Southern Hemisphere, Imbolg can be seen as a celebration of the return of the Sun or “the return of the light from the dark of winter”. It is also associated with the slow return of spring (in this case early spring), when new life is formed. This makes the holiday one of the Fertility festivals for the new season.

But tonight we complement these observances under a special event, the arrival of a Blue Moon!

A Blue Moon occurs when a full moon falls within a single month twice. For July 2015, the first full moon fell on July 1st. Today on July 31st, we’ll once again see the full moon in the evening sky. Technically the Moon hit its full phase at 6:46am eastern U.S. time. In the world of energy, the moon’s effects can be felt 3 days prior to its official phase and 3 days after. And of course the closer you are to the ‘official’ phase time, the stronger the energy will be.

Keep in mind however, that the ancients who lived by the moon didn’t have the luxury of Naval Observatory and precision clocks the way we do today. For them, the official time was sunset when Grandmother Moon bathed Mother Earth with her loving glow.

In some pagan traditions the phases of the moon represent the transition of knowledge within the Triple Goddess. The quarter moons representing the Maiden Goddess, the New Moon the Mother Goddess, the Full Moon the Grand Mother Goddess (which maybe one reason we refer to the moon as “Grandmother Moon”). The Blue Moon then is seen as the transition of the Grandmother or Crone to the Divine level of existence. She becomes an expression of the evolution of wisdom, as well as an example of the circle of life. She moves from a tangible wise old Crone to a spiritual energy within the Divine force of the universe. Continue reading

Happy Full Moon Friday the 13th!

The Full MoonMay The Day Bring You Blessings

It is said that wishing on a Full Moon is very magikal. Like any grand parent, she wants to spoil her daughter’s children.  While Mother Earth is asleep, Grand Mother Moon listens to our prayers and wishes to make our dreams come true.

And it is said that Friday the 13th is a day that brings good luck for transition and change. Breaking down barriers and overcoming struggle, it’s a day to let your magik shine.

Use the day, and especially the time after sunset to bring about Good Luck and positive energy that promotes the success for the change and transition you want most in your life.

Everyone here at Springwolf Reflections and Spring’s Haven wish you and yours many blessings on this special day that only comes around once in a very rare occasion. Enjoy the day and night with this full moon blessing: Continue reading

The Full Moon By Name

"Merlin In The Moon" by Springwolf 🐾

“Merlin In The Moon” by Springwolf 🐾

Have you ever wondered what’s behind the name of a Full Moon? Every month the moon graces Mother Earth with her bright Full phase. And occasionally she’ll pop in a second full phase in a single month too.

We know those occasional double full moons in a single month as a Blue Moon. But every full moon has its own name as well. You may have seen some people refer to the September’s full moon as the Harvest Moon, or the Fruit Moon. You might have even seen it called the Corn Moon. So which is it?

Well, it’s all of them really. As with most things, there isn’t a single definitive set of names to correspond to the full moon world wide. There are many.

Ages ago, cultures around the world kept track of the seasons by giving distinctive names to each recurring full moon. So there are a multitude of corresponding names to each Full moon of a single month. Continue reading