Tag Archive | Equinox

2018 September Equinox

Celebrating Mabon and Ostara

The fall equinox occurs when the sun shines directly on the equator and the length of day and night is nearly equal. These equinox events vary in date and time by a few hours to a day. Generally the Fall Equinox occurs on or around September 21st or 22nd.

This year the Fall Equinox will occur at 9:54 PM (Eastern U.S.) on Saturday , September 22. Celebration for Pagans should begin at Sunset on Saturday. Whither you’re in the Northern or Southern Hemisphere, the timing would be the same. But the Holiday you celebrate depends on which side of the hemisphere you’re in.

The North is turning away from the Sun, so we’re heading into fall. But if we’re moving away from the Sun, the southern hemisphere is moving toward the Sun. So folks on that side of the planet are starting their Spring season.

Mabon; The Feast of Avalon In The Northern Hemisphere
The time of Giving thanks, take time for Reflection.
Here in the north we’re celebrating Mabon, the Feast of Avalon.  This pagan holiday is assumed to have originated in the Celtic lands. But some argue it is highly influenced by Norse traditions. Continue reading

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2016 Equinox and the Full Moon

Moon Phase by Udell Enterprises, Inc.

Moon Phase by Udell Enterprises, Inc.

A Special Conjunction

This year, the first equinox coincides with a full moon. For Pagans this heightens the energy for both the Equinox holiday and the observance of the full moon.

The equinox marks that time of the year when the Earth begins to shift on its axis. It marks the change of seasons for each hemisphere; from Winter to Spring in the north and Summer to Fall in the south.

It’s best known as being the time when the number of hours for the day is equal to the number of hours for the night. But this isn’t accurate.

..day and night are not exactly equal at the equinox for two reasons. First, daytime begins the moment any part of the Sun is over the horizon, and it is not over until the last part of the Sun has set. If the Sun were to shrink to a starlike point and we lived in a world without air, the spring and fall equinoxes would truly have ‘equal nights.’ – From The Old Farmer’s Almanac

Here in Richmond Virginia, the equinox officially occurs on Sunday, March 20, 2016 at 12:30 AM EDT. That’s midnight on Saturday night. You can visit TimeAndDate.com to find the exact time in your area.

This astronomical event has long been observed as a spiritual occurrence. And that’s certainly true for Pagans around the world. But what that holiday celebrates and who or what it honors depends on if you’re in the Northern Hemisphere or in the South. Since Pagans begin their holiday observance at sunset and celebrate during the night hours, this becomes an important honoring of the event. Continue reading

Merry Mabon and Ostara

Apple Tea Time

Apple Tea Time

The Fall and Spring Equinox

Here in the Northern Hemisphere we are stepping into the cool crisp air and explosion of fall colors as the year begins to wane. Our Fall Equinox officially arrives on Wednesday September 23rd at 4:22 am Eastern U.S.

The Equinox rings in Mabon (May-bawn) for Pagans. A holiday that celebrates the harvest season, also known as the Feast of Avalon, the Festival of the Wine and the Festival of the Apple Harvest.  You can learn more about the History of Mabon.

Celebrations often begin at sunset on the night before the official holiday. That would be Tuesday evening. Spiritual observations honor the spirits and energy that assist with the gardens, farms, flocks and herds. Thank Mother Earth for the rain, the fertile ground and Father Sun for the warm rays that promote growth in the fields.

Colors of fall are used for decoration, along with the changing leaves and home-made dishes using the items from the harvest. Pumpkin pie is always a favorite in our house. Along with pecan pie, we are in the south after all.

You can hold a private celebration with an intimate tea party featuring apple tea, apple pie, cinnamon apple bread, cupcakes and more.
Continue reading

The First of the 2015 Equinox Holidays

springtimeAstronomical and Meteorological Spring or Fall

In most parts of the world, we define the seasons in two ways. By the Astronomical or Meteorological dates. Astronomical seasons refer to the position of Earth’s orbit in relation to the sun taking into account equinoxes and solstices. Meteorological seasons are instead based on the annual temperature cycle and measure the meteorological state as well as coinciding with the calendar to determine a clear transition between the seasons. ~ MetOffice-UK

The Solstices and Equinoxes are considered to be the astronomical transition points between the seasons. Because they are connected to the Sun and Moon, they were important times to early Pagans.

Of course in the old days, our ancestors didn’t have the benefit of the Naval or Royal Observatories and Satellites to mark the exact second of the Equinox. They relied on Astronomical monuments, like Stonehenge as an example to tell them when the sun was nearing an equinox.

We have the benefit of technology and hundreds of years of study to help us out today.
The March equinox happens at the same moment across the world but is converted to local time. In 2015, it falls on March 20 at 6:45 P.M. EDT, 5:45 P.M. CDT, 4:45 P.M. MDT, and 3:45 P.M. PDT, for example. ~ Farmer’s Almanac Continue reading

The History Of Ostara – The ‘Spring Equinox’

newday-wolfThe Vernal Equinox – The Festival of Ēostre
By Springwolf, D.D., Ph.D.  🐾

The Spring Equinox festival is based in Germanic Paganism. Ēostre or Ostara (Northumbrian Old English: Ēostre; West Saxon Old English: Ēastre; Old High German: *Ôstara) is a goddess in Germanic paganism who, by way of the Germanic month bears her name.

As a pagan holiday Ostara is one of the more confusing and convoluted festivals in terms of its history. It’s claimed by German neo-Pagans, Norse, Saxon and Celt. Celts admit that holiday is not one of their original observances and therefore it’s accepted to be part of a reconstruction of old Celtic ways.

There is speculation that this holiday owes its roots to the Romans who took their holiday into the invasion of Ireland and even spread into Germanic cultures. However, this does not play out when one reviews Celtic or Germanic mythology and history. Continue reading

The History of Mabon – The Feast of Avalon

The Apple Feast

Celebrating The Fall Equinox
By Springwolf, D.D., Ph.D.  🐾

Mabon (May-bawn) is also known as the Feast of Avalon, the Festival of the Wine and the Festival of the Apple Harvest. Celebrated on the Fall Equinox.

To the Celts, Avalon is the mysterious place for the land of the dead and literally means the “land of apples”. Thus this is a holiday for celebrating the bounty of the harvest and the desire for the living to be reunited with their deceased loved ones. But the holiday is also named for the Welsh God Mabon.

Mabon translates to the “great son”, but some say it’s the “great sun” and relates to the waning reign of the Sun in the sky as summer fades and the season changes to beacon the darkness of fall and winter.

From mythology, Mabon the person was the son of Modred who was kidnapped at the age of 3 and later rescued by King Arthur. His life represents the innocence of youth, the strength of survival and the growing wisdom of the elderly. Continue reading