Tag Archive | Hemisphere

The Full Moon In The Southern Hemisphere

"Merlin In The Moon" by Springwolf 🐾

“Merlin In The Moon” by Springwolf 🐾

What Is The Name Of The Moon

As with all things in the world, where you are located will dictate how you associate this to that. Meaning and names of objects like the Moon vary around the world. Cultures assign names to each full moon based on their traditions, climate, animals, crops and how they view the world around them. There isn’t one complete list of this to that anywhere or for anything. There are many.

When it comes to Full Moon names, you can’t simply take a set of names from the North, reverse them and apply them to the South. This assumes we all look at things the same way through the same eyes. Imagine a Native American from the Cherokee Nation applying their moon names to the Aboriginal moon phases in Australia. It probably wouldn’t make sense to the folks who live down under.

But because Europeans settled in both the North and South, many of the moon names traveled with them to new lands and continents. In many ways this does a dis-service to the original peoples of the land in question and the names they came to know and associate with the Moon phases. Like the Tribal Nations in America, each group has its own language. The most common reference for the moon is Alkina and it’s associated with female energy. But try to find which Aboriginal Nation uses that word. I didn’t have any luck at all. Many words for the moon in other nations associate the moon with masculine energy. And that’s just Australia.

The Maori are the first people of New Zealand. They brought their Polynesian Mythology and the name of Moon with them to the land of the Kiwis. Here the Moon gets her name from the Goddess Marama, who governs the Moon and Death.

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Merry Beltaine and Samhain

Merry Bealtaine!

May Day Bouquet

It’s May Day! 

Here in the northern hemisphere it’s May Day, the official start of spring. A time to celebrate the return of the Sun and the warm days of summer. To prepare for the growing season and the celebration of the return of life.

Known as the Festival of Fire, Beltaine honors both the union of male and female, and the return of the Sun God, Bel. By the Solar Calendar, the holiday is celebrated on May 1st. But by the Lunar Calendar it’s honored on May 6th. To learn more about this holiday, visit Beltaine: The Fire Festival.

The Old Farmers Almanac has this to say about May Day:
Ancient spring rites that related human fertility to crop fertility gave birth to most modern May Day festivities. May 1 is the traditional day to crown the May queen, dance around the maypole, perform mummers’ plays, and generally celebrate the return of spring. Although our Pilgrim fathers were horrified by these reminders of a pagan past and outlawed all such activities, the maypole dance remains an enduring event. In Great Britain, the custom of “bringing in the May” involves gathering “knots,” or branches with buds, on the eve or early morning of May 1. In England, a favorite branch is hawthorn. In Scotland and Wales, people choose the rowan, or mountain ash. In North America, we often select forsythia, lilac, or pussy willow branches to bring spring and the prospect of new life into our homes.

Making a May Day basket is also one of these fairly modern traditions that can be shared by Pagan and non-Pagan alike. One of my favorite celebration items is making a May Day bouquet. These flower filled bouquets are most often in a cone shape, hold blooming flowers of your liking and hung on the front door handle.

But what about the seasonal changes in the southern hemisphere? They’re entering into fall, not spring.  Continue reading

The First of the 2015 Equinox Holidays

springtimeAstronomical and Meteorological Spring or Fall

In most parts of the world, we define the seasons in two ways. By the Astronomical or Meteorological dates. Astronomical seasons refer to the position of Earth’s orbit in relation to the sun taking into account equinoxes and solstices. Meteorological seasons are instead based on the annual temperature cycle and measure the meteorological state as well as coinciding with the calendar to determine a clear transition between the seasons. ~ MetOffice-UK

The Solstices and Equinoxes are considered to be the astronomical transition points between the seasons. Because they are connected to the Sun and Moon, they were important times to early Pagans.

Of course in the old days, our ancestors didn’t have the benefit of the Naval or Royal Observatories and Satellites to mark the exact second of the Equinox. They relied on Astronomical monuments, like Stonehenge as an example to tell them when the sun was nearing an equinox.

We have the benefit of technology and hundreds of years of study to help us out today.
The March equinox happens at the same moment across the world but is converted to local time. In 2015, it falls on March 20 at 6:45 P.M. EDT, 5:45 P.M. CDT, 4:45 P.M. MDT, and 3:45 P.M. PDT, for example. ~ Farmer’s Almanac Continue reading

High Holy Days: Southern Hemisphere

Howling Dingo

A subspecies of the wolf, our cousin the Dingo

The Pagan Sabbats In The Southern Hemisphere

The early pagans around the world were very balanced in the way they scheduled their lives. One of the places this is seen most clear are in the High Holy days.

Each festival celebration falls in between a solstice or equinox. But the holidays were also celebrations of the seasons and the change of energy throughout the year.

Additionally, Pagans are pretty big on using the right energy in concert with the right movement of time and space. In other words, we align our conscious thoughts and connections with the Divine in our lives based on the energy that surrounds us.

Simply put, how you relate to the world around you and how you feel connected to the “this or that” in your life, all depends on where you are and the beliefs you choose to follow. It doesn’t makes sense to align your energy with the warm summer sun when outside your window it’s snowing like a blizzard. Because of this, the Southern Hemisphere sees the holidays differently than we do here in the North. Continue reading