Tag Archive | fall

2018 September Equinox

Celebrating Mabon and Ostara

The fall equinox occurs when the sun shines directly on the equator and the length of day and night is nearly equal. These equinox events vary in date and time by a few hours to a day. Generally the Fall Equinox occurs on or around September 21st or 22nd.

This year the Fall Equinox will occur at 9:54 PM (Eastern U.S.) on Saturday , September 22. Celebration for Pagans should begin at Sunset on Saturday. Whither you’re in the Northern or Southern Hemisphere, the timing would be the same. But the Holiday you celebrate depends on which side of the hemisphere you’re in.

The North is turning away from the Sun, so we’re heading into fall. But if we’re moving away from the Sun, the southern hemisphere is moving toward the Sun. So folks on that side of the planet are starting their Spring season.

Mabon; The Feast of Avalon In The Northern Hemisphere
The time of Giving thanks, take time for Reflection.
Here in the north we’re celebrating Mabon, the Feast of Avalon.  This pagan holiday is assumed to have originated in the Celtic lands. But some argue it is highly influenced by Norse traditions. Continue reading

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The First of the 2015 Equinox Holidays

springtimeAstronomical and Meteorological Spring or Fall

In most parts of the world, we define the seasons in two ways. By the Astronomical or Meteorological dates. Astronomical seasons refer to the position of Earth’s orbit in relation to the sun taking into account equinoxes and solstices. Meteorological seasons are instead based on the annual temperature cycle and measure the meteorological state as well as coinciding with the calendar to determine a clear transition between the seasons. ~ MetOffice-UK

The Solstices and Equinoxes are considered to be the astronomical transition points between the seasons. Because they are connected to the Sun and Moon, they were important times to early Pagans.

Of course in the old days, our ancestors didn’t have the benefit of the Naval or Royal Observatories and Satellites to mark the exact second of the Equinox. They relied on Astronomical monuments, like Stonehenge as an example to tell them when the sun was nearing an equinox.

We have the benefit of technology and hundreds of years of study to help us out today.
The March equinox happens at the same moment across the world but is converted to local time. In 2015, it falls on March 20 at 6:45 P.M. EDT, 5:45 P.M. CDT, 4:45 P.M. MDT, and 3:45 P.M. PDT, for example. ~ Farmer’s Almanac Continue reading