Tag Archive | blood

The Full Blood Moon Eclipse of January 2019

The Full Blood Moon

Yes We’ve Covered That

The January 21 total lunar eclipse will be the last one until May 2021, and the last one visible from the United States until 2022. But this full moon is also a “Super Blood Moon” and a lunar eclipse, which makes this month’s full moon so special.

The partial stage of the lunar eclipse begins at 10:34 p.m. EST Sunday night (0334 GMT Monday morning) with the total eclipse beginning at 11:41 p.m. EST (0441 GMT Monday morning). Totality lasts for about an hour, and then the moon will exit. – Read more at Space.com

We’ve covered Full moons, blood moons and even lunar eclipses here on Reflections. So at the risk to not be redundant,  here’s a few links that you might like to peruse as you search for information about this special moon.

May you all have a wonderful Full moon celebration and ritual.
Spring

© Springwolfs Hanko

© 2019 Springwolf, D.D., Ph.D. Springwolf Reflections / Springs Haven, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

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The Legend of the Sacred King

Father Sun and Mother Earth

A Celtic Tale of Sacrifice and the Blood Moon

In ancient history, many cultures hold tales concerning a Sacred King. Back then a King was a form of deity, or was placed on a throne by Divine hands. As such they were worshiped as much as they were revered and honored. The Sacred King we’re going to talk about comes from the early pagan days of the Celts.

In this tale, the Sacred King is associated with the Sun, and in some variations with the Sun God Lugh who is honored during the 1st Harvest Festival known as Lughnasadh, celebrated on August 1st in Northern Hemisphere.  Elements of this story are scattered through pagan festivals throughout the year, and have been passed on through the generations of practitioners primarily through oral tales. Even today, most Pagans celebrate these events in our modern festivals and rituals, but often as separate events instead of one long story arc. 

In his writings, Sir James George Frazer describes in a book called The Golden Bough (1890–1915); the sacred king represented the spirit of vegetation. He came into being in the spring, reigned during the summer, and ritually died at harvest time, only to be reborn at the winter solstice to wax and rule again. 

Elements of Frazer’s book, document Pagan tales celebrated throughout the cycle of the year in one story. There are elements of the Holy and Oak King, who share governance of the seasons as they wax and wane between summer and winter. There’s the association of the fertile spring equinox when the Great God and Maiden Goddess unite and reign through the summer. And the outcome of that union in the fall, which provides for an abundant harvest season. Continue reading

Stop Mixing Mysticism with Science!

Merlin's Blood Moon by Springwolf 🐾

Merlin’s Blood Moon by Springwolf 🐾

NO, IT IS NOT A FULL BLUE BLOOD MOON!

I wish these mainstream media people would stop mixing mysticism with science. If you’re going to mix spiritual mysticism with scientific explanation, you should at least get the mysticism part right.

Early Pagans coined the phrase “Blood Moon” to signify the full moon phases of the Fall Harvest. Every full moon during the harvest season was once known as the Blood Moon and it has nothing to do with the color of the Moon.

Over time, that monthly harvest celebration evolved to become the Full Moon nearest the Autumn Equinox or the first full moon of the autumn harvest, also known as the Harvest Moon. For most Pagans, that Full Harvest Moon occurs in September or October, if you’re in the Northern Hemisphere. Continue reading

The Full Blood Moon

The Full Blood Moon

The Moon of the Autumn Equinox

The Harvest Moon is usually defined as the full moon closest to the autumn equinox. For us in the Northern Hemisphere, that usually occurs on or near September 22 each year. This year however, the nearest full moon to the equinox will occur this week on October  5, 2017.

Many people think this full moon gets its name from a reddish glow that may appear on the full moon. But that red color doesn’t happen with every Fall Full Moon. This effect is caused by the atmosphere of the earth. When sunlight is scattered by passing through Earth’s atmosphere, the other colors of the spectrum are removed. The moon will appear reddish when it’s nearer to the horizon, for the same reason a sunset or sunrise appears red. It’s all because of the Earth’s shadow.

A red moon is sometimes used to refer to four total lunar eclipses that happen in the space of two years, a phenomenon astronomers call a lunar tetrad. The eclipses in a tetrad occur six months apart with at least six Full Moons between them. So a red moon, isn’t a completely rare thing when an eclipse occurs.

A lot of Space or Astronomical journals have begun using the term “Blood Moon” to describe all these red moon occurrences. Unfortunately they didn’t do their research and made some significant assumptions about the phrase. It has nothing to do with the color of the moon at all. Continue reading