Merry International Faery Day!

Lavender And Lark

Niamh and the Raven
Lavender And Lark

June 24th Is International Faery Day

May all the Faery’s in your world greet you with smiles and glee,
May you share a laugh, comfort a sorrow and toast with me,
To the beautiful mystical Faery folk who live in the magikal tree.
Spring © 2015

Celebrate by leaving a small plate of fresh fruit, nuts and sweet treats in your yard or garden for your faery friends.

Right about sunset, read them a poem, a story or tell them a tale from your imagination. You can even tell them a dream you’ve had about them.

Thank them for helping you in your garden, yard or even bringing you some magikal smiles into your life each and every day. They’ll appreciate the entertainment and the gratitude. But remember this is their day to be honored. Don’t use the time to petition them for help or ask for something. Save that for a New Moon ritual.

Additional Reading:

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The Felted sculpture in the picture is by Lavender and Lark who truly create some beautiful pieces. Please visit their site and let them know how much you like their work. And perhaps you can even purchase your very own faery piece too.

Now that I’m done with errands, I had time to go through Lavender and Lark’s website. I found out this piece is called “Niamh and the Raven”.

The Story Of Niamh
In Irish mythology, Niamh is the daughter of Manannán mac Lir. She is one of the Queens of Tir na nÓg (the land of youth). Niamh crossed the Western Sea on a magical horse, Embarr, and asked Fionn mac Cumhaill if his son Oisín would come with her to Tír na nÓg. Oisín agreed and went with her, promising his father he would return to visit soon.

Oisín was a member of the Fianna and, though he fell in love with Niamh during their time together in Tír na nÓg, he became homesick after what he thought was three years. Niamh let him borrow Embarr, who could run above ground, and made him promise not to get off of the horse or touch Irish soil.

The three years he spent in Tír na nÓg turned out to be 300 Irish years. When Oisín returned to Ireland, he asked where he could find Fionn mac Cumhail and the Fianna, only to find that they had been dead for hundreds of years and were now only remembered as legends. Whilst travelling through Ireland, Oisín was asked by some men to help them move a standing stone. He reached down to help them, but fell off his horse. Upon touching the ground he instantly became an old man. ~ Wikipedia

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Our Little Offering
Tonight we shared a plate of our favorite yummies with our backyard faeries.

A little popcorn, cashews, strawberries and crackers.
With a tiny slice of cheesecake.
Faery-Plate
We placed the plate right under the Blue Bottle Tree.
BlueBottleTree4

© Springwolfs Hanko

© 2015 Springwolf, D.D., Ph.D. Springwolf Reflections / Springs Haven, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

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