Tag Archive | imbolg

Merry Imbolg & Lammas for 2019

Celebration of the return Sun

Celebration of the Sun

The Festival of Lights and Fire

The time of Spring is upon us here in the Northern Hemisphere as the Sun begins his return to warm our hearts and extend his light in our day. His return rings in the first of the Spring Holidays known as Imbolc, Imbolg, Brigid’s Day or the Festival of Lights.

In the Southern Hemisphere the summer is marked by its peak of the Sun during the Fire Festival. It is the time of Lughnasadh, also known as Lammas or the Fire Festival which honors the Celtic hero Lugh. It is the first of the Pagan Harvest Festivals and the time of year to thank the Tuatha Dé Danann (the Faeries) for their help in our gardens.

These Sabbats (Pagan Holidays) are observed on February 1st or 2nd, depending on one’s personal Tradition (spiritual denomination). Because Pagans celebrate on a Lunar Calendar schedule, our holiday observances actually begin  at sunset on the evening before the scheduled day.

Those who recognize February 1st as the observed holiday, will begin their rituals on January 31st. And for some places in the world, that’s already tonight.

Everyone here at Springwolf Reflections and Spring’s Haven extend our wishes to you and yours for a wonderful and joyous celebration of the warmth. Where ever you are in the world,

May Your Season Be Blessed with Abundance and Happiness

© Springwolfs Hanko

© 2019 Springwolf, D.D., Ph.D. Springwolf Reflections / Springs Haven, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

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Merry Imbolg & Lammas 2018

Celebration of the return Sun

Celebration of the Sun

The Festival of Lights and Fire

The time of Spring is upon us here in the Northern Hemisphere as the Sun begins his return to warm our hearts and extend his light in our day. His return rings in the first of the Spring Holidays known as Imbolc, Imbolg, Brigid’s Day or the Festival of Lights.

In the Southern Hemisphere the summer is marked by its peak of the Sun during the Fire Festival. It is the time of Lughnasadh, also known as Lammas or the Fire Festival which honors the Celtic hero Lugh. It is the first of the Pagan Harvest Festivals and the time of year to thank the Tuatha Dé Danann (the Faeries) for their help in our gardens.

These Sabbats (Pagan Holidays) are observed on February 1st or 2nd, depending on one’s personal Tradition (spiritual denomination). Because Pagans celebrate on a Lunar Calendar schedule, our holiday observances actually begin  at sunset on the evening before the scheduled day.

Those who recognize February 1st as the observed holiday, will begin their rituals on January 31st. While others, like my Clan, being our celebrations tonight and observe the holiday on February 1st.

This year we’re blessed with the energy of GrandMother Moon’s full phase, ringing in the Snow Moon for the north and the  Thunder Moon of the south.

Everyone here at Springwolf Reflections and Spring’s Haven extend our wishes to you and yours for a wonderful and joyous celebration of warmth and light. Where ever you are in the world,

May Your Season Be Blessed with Abundance and Happiness

© Springwolfs Hanko

© 2014 Springwolf, D.D., Ph.D. Springwolf Reflections / Springs Haven, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Merry Lammas & Imbolg 2016

Arctic Wolf Fire

“Arctic Wolf Fire”
By Tom-in-Silence

The Festivals of Fire and Light
Celebrations of August 1st or 2nd

These Sabbats (Pagan Holidays) are observed on August 1st or 2nd, depending on one’s personal Tradition (spiritual denomination). The early pagans were not blessed with NASA or the Naval Observatory, so their celebrations varied slightly from places to place and Tradition to Tradition. Over time these holidays began to find stability as official calendars become more commonplace throughout Indo-European countries.

Even though many parts of the world transitioned to Solar calendars, Pagans still celebrated their rituals on a Lunar cycle. Thus our holiday observances actually begin  at sunset on the evening before the scheduled day of the Sabbat. And that too can depend on where you are in the world. Continue reading

Merry Lammas & Imbolg 2014

Arctic Wolf Fire

“Arctic Wolf Fire”
By Tom-in-Silence

The Festivals of Fire and Light
Celebrations of August 1st or 2nd

These Sabbats (Pagan Holidays) are observed on August 1st or 2nd, depending on one’s personal Tradition (spiritual denomination). The early pagans were not blessed with NASA or the Naval Observatory, so their celebrations varied slightly from places to place and Tradition to Tradition. Over time these holidays began to find stability as official calendars become more commonplace throughout Indo-European countries.

Even though many parts of the world transitioned to Solar calendars, Pagans still celebrated their rituals on a Lunar cycle. Thus our holiday observances actually begin  at sunset on the evening before the scheduled day of the Sabbat. And that too can depend on where you are in the world.

May Your Season Be Blessed with Abundance and Happiness

Here in the Northern Hemisphere we are still enjoying the warmth of the summer months. Our days are long and Sun is with us into the later hours of the evening. The sun begins to set near 8:00pm; for instance sunset here on the east coast of the U.S., sunset is officially 8:14pm.  Where as in the Southern Hemisphere of Winter sunset is officially at 5:32pm. I don’t know about you; but I’ve always enjoyed the fall and winter holidays the most. They start earlier and there’s more time to sing, dance and be merry!

Continue reading

Merry Imbolg & Lammas

Celebration of the return Sun

Celebration of the Sun

The Festival of Lights and Fire

The time of Spring is upon us here in the Northern Hemisphere as the Sun begins his return to warm our hearts and extend his light in our day. His return rings in the first of the Spring Holidays known as Imbolc, Imbolg, Brigid’s Day or the Festival of Lights.

In the Southern Hemisphere the summer is marked by its peak of the Sun during the Fire Festival. It is the time of Lughnasadh, also known as Lammas or the Fire Festival which honors the Celtic hero Lugh. It is the first of the Pagan Harvest Festivals and the time of year to thank the Tuatha Dé Danann (the Faeries) for their help in our gardens.

These Sabbats (Pagan Holidays) are observed on February 1st or 2nd, depending on one’s personal Tradition (spiritual denomination). Because Pagans celebrate on a Lunar Calendar schedule, our holiday observances actually begin  at sunset on the evening before the scheduled day.

Those who recognize February 1st as the observed holiday, will begin their rituals on January 31st. And for some places in the world, that’s already tonight.

Everyone here at Springwolf Reflections and Spring’s Haven extend our wishes to you and yours for a wonderful and joyous celebration of the warmth. Where ever you are in the world,

May Your Season Be Blessed with Abundance and Happiness

© Springwolfs Hanko

© 2014 Springwolf, D.D., Ph.D. Springwolf Reflections / Springs Haven, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

The History of Imbolg

Paganism

Imbolg – Celebration of the Maiden Goddess

The Festival of Lights & Brighid
By Springwolf, D.D., Ph.D.  🐾

Known as Imbolg or Imbolc. The Old Irish gaeilge  i mbolg translates to “in the belly”. Linguistic historians say this refers to the pregnancy of ewes and links the festival to fertility. As gaeilge progressed and evolved, Imbolg eventually becomes Imbolc. Thus the holiday is known by these two names. So either is correct.

Because the feis or festival is associated as the first spring holiday, it is linked to the returning of the sun, along with longer and warmer days. As such, it becomes known as Imbolc: the Festival of Lights.

In Celtic ceremony, Imbolg falls between the Winter solstice and the Spring equinox on February 1st or 2nd in the Northern Hemisphere and August 1st in the Southern Hemisphere. Continue reading